Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services
Addiction Services Bed Availability
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Frequently Asked  
 
What is the definition of "available/open"?
Each program enters their program's availability at least once per shift. If they have a bed available, and no one is waiting in their triage or waiting room, they will list that bed as "available" on this website.
Do some programs have a waitlist?
Yes, some programs maintain a waitlist. If they have a bed available and are contacting people on their waitlist regarding that bed, they will not enter that bed as available on the website, until they have exhausted their waitlist.
Will this be available on an IPhone app?
You can view this website on an iPhone, other smart phones, and tablets, but we don't have a formal app.
Does an individual have to be intoxicated to be eligible for detox?
No.
What is the recommended treatment for someone with an opioid use disorder? Is detox necessary?
Detox is not routinely needed for someone with an opioid use disorder. Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) is the evidence-based recommended treatment for individuals with an opioid use disorder. There are three FDA-approved medications for opioid use disorders: Methadone, Buprenorphine, and Naltrexone. A person can be inducted on MAT in an outpatient program. Please click here for a map of Medicaid MAT providers.
Why may I need to pay in full prior to treatment even though a facility accepts my insurance plan?
Although some facilities accept commercial plans, eligibility is based on each plan coverage purchased by the subscriber. Prior to inpatient detox admission clients may be required to pay in full out of pocket expenses related to their deductible, co-pay, and/or co-insurance. Commercial policies commonly include out of network benefits; the facility may be able to verify eligibility during normal business hours if the client presents for inpatient detox. Out of network eligibility is based on specific plan purchased by subscriber.
What is "Medically Managed Detox (4.2)" service?
Medically managed detoxification, provided in a private freestanding psychiatric hospital, general hospital or state-operated facility, is the medically directed treatment of a substance use disorder, where the individual's admission is the result of a serious or dangerous substance dependence that requires a medical evaluation and 24/7 medical withdrawal management. For individuals who have co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, psychiatric assessment and management is available.
What is "Medically Monitored Detox (3.7D)" service?
Medically monitored Detox, provided in a residential facility licensed by the Department of Public Health to offer residential detoxification and evaluation, involves treatment of substance use dependence when 24-hour medical and nursing oversight is required. Comprehensive evaluations and withdrawal management are provided as well as short-term counseling and referral to other supports.
What is "Intensive Residential (3.7)" service?
Intensive Residential Treatment for substance dependence or co-occurring disorders is a residential service provided in a facility licensed by the Department of Public Health to offer intensive residential treatment, or in a state-operated facility. These services are provided in a 24-hour setting and are intended to treat individuals with substance use or co-occurring disorders who require an intensive rehabilitation program. Services are provided within a 15 to 30 day period and include assessment, medical and psychiatric evaluation if indicated, and an intensive regimen of treatment modalities including individual and family therapy, specialty groups, psychosocial education, orientation to AA or similar support groups, and instruction in relapse prevention.
What is "Intensive Residential: Co-Occurring Enhanced (3.7E)" service?
Intensive residential treatment co-occurring enhanced services are provided in accordance with requirements designated by the Department to individuals with severe co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders who require integrated intensive rehabilitation services.
What is "Intermediate Residential (3.5)" service?
Intermediate residential treatment for substance use disorders is a service provided in a facility licensed by the Department of Public Health to offer intermediate treatment. These services are provided in a 24 hour residential program that provides counseling and other rehabilitative services in a structured environment. These residential services are intended to address significant problems with behavior and functioning in major life areas due to a substance use disorder with the goal of community re-integration. A minimum of twenty hours per week of addiction services in a structured recovery environment is provided to individuals who generally remain in treatment for 3 to 6 months.
What is "Intermediate Residential: Pregnant and Parenting Women (3.5)" service?
Intermediate residential treatment is a service provided in a facility licensed by the Department of Public Health to offer intermediate treatment to women with children and pregnant women with substance use dependence. These services are provided in a 24 hour residential program that provides counseling and other rehabilitative services in a structured environment. Services include integration of substance use and prenatal services; child care and child development services; direct interventions or linkages to programs for infants and children with prenatal exposure to drugs and alcohol; and facilitating access to Birth to Three programs, Early Head Start, and WIC. Pregnant and parenting women must be granted priority access within 48 hours of their request for treatment or provided interim services that include, at a minimum, HIV and TB Education, the risk of needle sharing, if applicable, counseling on the effects of alcohol and drug use on the fetus, referral for prenatal care and referral to a treatment provider offering PHP or IOP services. Women and/or women and their children generally remain in treatment for 3-6 months.
What is "Long Term Residential (3.3)" service?
Long term residential care for substance use disorders is a service provided in a facility licensed by the Department of Public Health to offer intermediate or long-term treatment or care and rehabilitation. This service is intended for individuals having significant impairment and long term difficulties with their functioning in major life areas due to a substance use disorder. Services are provided in a structured recovery environment having 24/7 staff supervision, and may include vocational exploration and training as well as skills training intended to assist individuals with re-integration into the community. Individuals generally remain in treatment for 6 to 9 months.
What is "Transitional/Halfway House (3.1)" service?
Transitional Living and Halfway Houses for people with substance use disorders are licensed by the Department of Public Health to offer intermediate, long-term treatment care and rehabilitation. These services are intended for individuals who have experienced significant problems with their behavior and functioning in major life areas due to a substance use disorder and are ready to reintegrate back into the community. Minimal services are provided in a structured recovery environment with the focus being primarily on obtaining employment.
What is "Recovery House" service?
Recovery Houses are intended for individuals in recovery from substance use or co-occurring disorders who would benefit from a clean and sober environment to support their recovery. These houses provide 24 hour temporary housing and supportive services for such persons who present without evidence of intoxication, withdrawal or psychiatric symptoms that would suggest inappropriateness for participation in such a setting. The length of stay for residents is generally less than 90 days. Recovery houses are not licensed and do not offer treatment services.
 
For questions please use the comments page
For questions please use the comments page
Addiction Services Bed Availability
Frequently Asked
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  Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services
Addiction Services Bed Availability
home   about   faq   comments   links
 
Frequently Asked  
 
What is the definition of "available/open"?
Each program enters their program's availability at least once per shift. If they have a bed available, and no one is waiting in their triage or waiting room, they will list that bed as "available" on this website.
Do some programs have a waitlist?
Yes, some programs maintain a waitlist. If they have a bed available and are contacting people on their waitlist regarding that bed, they will not enter that bed as available on the website, until they have exhausted their waitlist.
Will this be available on an IPhone app?
You can view this website on an iPhone, other smart phones, and tablets, but we don't have a formal app.
Does an individual have to be intoxicated to be eligible for detox?
No.
What is the recommended treatment for someone with an opioid use disorder? Is detox necessary?
Detox is not routinely needed for someone with an opioid use disorder. Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) is the evidence-based recommended treatment for individuals with an opioid use disorder. There are three FDA-approved medications for opioid use disorders: Methadone, Buprenorphine, and Naltrexone. A person can be inducted on MAT in an outpatient program. Please click here for a map of Medicaid MAT providers.
Why may I need to pay in full prior to treatment even though a facility accepts my insurance plan?
Although some facilities accept commercial plans, eligibility is based on each plan coverage purchased by the subscriber. Prior to inpatient detox admission clients may be required to pay in full out of pocket expenses related to their deductible, co-pay, and/or co-insurance. Commercial policies commonly include out of network benefits; the facility may be able to verify eligibility during normal business hours if the client presents for inpatient detox. Out of network eligibility is based on specific plan purchased by subscriber.
What is "Medically Managed Detox (4.2)" service?
Medically managed detoxification, provided in a private freestanding psychiatric hospital, general hospital or state-operated facility, is the medically directed treatment of a substance use disorder, where the individual's admission is the result of a serious or dangerous substance dependence that requires a medical evaluation and 24/7 medical withdrawal management. For individuals who have co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, psychiatric assessment and management is available.
What is "Medically Monitored Detox (3.7D)" service?
Medically monitored Detox, provided in a residential facility licensed by the Department of Public Health to offer residential detoxification and evaluation, involves treatment of substance use dependence when 24-hour medical and nursing oversight is required. Comprehensive evaluations and withdrawal management are provided as well as short-term counseling and referral to other supports.
What is "Intensive Residential (3.7)" service?
Intensive Residential Treatment for substance dependence or co-occurring disorders is a residential service provided in a facility licensed by the Department of Public Health to offer intensive residential treatment, or in a state-operated facility. These services are provided in a 24-hour setting and are intended to treat individuals with substance use or co-occurring disorders who require an intensive rehabilitation program. Services are provided within a 15 to 30 day period and include assessment, medical and psychiatric evaluation if indicated, and an intensive regimen of treatment modalities including individual and family therapy, specialty groups, psychosocial education, orientation to AA or similar support groups, and instruction in relapse prevention.
What is "Intensive Residential: Co-Occurring Enhanced (3.7E)" service?
Intensive residential treatment co-occurring enhanced services are provided in accordance with requirements designated by the Department to individuals with severe co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders who require integrated intensive rehabilitation services.
What is "Intermediate Residential (3.5)" service?
Intermediate residential treatment for substance use disorders is a service provided in a facility licensed by the Department of Public Health to offer intermediate treatment. These services are provided in a 24 hour residential program that provides counseling and other rehabilitative services in a structured environment. These residential services are intended to address significant problems with behavior and functioning in major life areas due to a substance use disorder with the goal of community re-integration. A minimum of twenty hours per week of addiction services in a structured recovery environment is provided to individuals who generally remain in treatment for 3 to 6 months.
What is "Intermediate Residential: Pregnant and Parenting Women (3.5)" service?
Intermediate residential treatment is a service provided in a facility licensed by the Department of Public Health to offer intermediate treatment to women with children and pregnant women with substance use dependence. These services are provided in a 24 hour residential program that provides counseling and other rehabilitative services in a structured environment. Services include integration of substance use and prenatal services; child care and child development services; direct interventions or linkages to programs for infants and children with prenatal exposure to drugs and alcohol; and facilitating access to Birth to Three programs, Early Head Start, and WIC. Pregnant and parenting women must be granted priority access within 48 hours of their request for treatment or provided interim services that include, at a minimum, HIV and TB Education, the risk of needle sharing, if applicable, counseling on the effects of alcohol and drug use on the fetus, referral for prenatal care and referral to a treatment provider offering PHP or IOP services. Women and/or women and their children generally remain in treatment for 3-6 months.
What is "Long Term Residential (3.3)" service?
Long term residential care for substance use disorders is a service provided in a facility licensed by the Department of Public Health to offer intermediate or long-term treatment or care and rehabilitation. This service is intended for individuals having significant impairment and long term difficulties with their functioning in major life areas due to a substance use disorder. Services are provided in a structured recovery environment having 24/7 staff supervision, and may include vocational exploration and training as well as skills training intended to assist individuals with re-integration into the community. Individuals generally remain in treatment for 6 to 9 months.
What is "Transitional/Halfway House (3.1)" service?
Transitional Living and Halfway Houses for people with substance use disorders are licensed by the Department of Public Health to offer intermediate, long-term treatment care and rehabilitation. These services are intended for individuals who have experienced significant problems with their behavior and functioning in major life areas due to a substance use disorder and are ready to reintegrate back into the community. Minimal services are provided in a structured recovery environment with the focus being primarily on obtaining employment.
What is "Recovery House" service?
Recovery Houses are intended for individuals in recovery from substance use or co-occurring disorders who would benefit from a clean and sober environment to support their recovery. These houses provide 24 hour temporary housing and supportive services for such persons who present without evidence of intoxication, withdrawal or psychiatric symptoms that would suggest inappropriateness for participation in such a setting. The length of stay for residents is generally less than 90 days. Recovery houses are not licensed and do not offer treatment services.
 
For questions please use the comments page
For questions please use the comments page